How much protein do you need before bed to increase muscle size and strength?

Resistance exercise – like lifting free weights, using a weight machine, or doing bodyweight exercises – breaks down muscle. And, at the same time, stimulates it to get stronger and bigger.

The balance between muscle degradation and the stimulus to get bigger and stronger is delicate and can be modified by things like your diet.

It has been known for a long time that eating or drinking protein immediately after exercise tips the balance in favor of getting bigger and stronger.

A new area of research is looking at the effect ingesting protein before sleep has on lean muscle gains.

Lots of muscle recovery and adaptation happens while you are asleep. Pre-sleep protein is a strategic time to increase overall protein intake and prime your body for maximal strength and size gains.

The effect pre-sleep protein has on overnight muscle protein synthesis

The rate of muscle protein synthesis tends to be lower at night compared to in the morning. Taking a protein supplement right before bed increases overnight muscle protein synthesis, which may be a good way to boost your net muscle protein synthesis rate.

Especially if you do some resistance exercise in the evening too.

Two studies, both coming out of the laboratory of Dr. Luc van Loon at Maastricht University in the Netherlands, tell us what we really need to know to take advantage of this concept.

The first study was done in 2012. The researchers took sixteen healthy young males, got them to do a single session of resistance-type exercise (i.e. lifting weights), gave them proper post-workout nutrition (20g of protein and 60g of carbohydrates), and then split the participants into two groups.

One group got 40g of protein 30 minutes before bed and the other was given a placebo.

The group that took protein before bed had higher rates of muscle protein synthesis.

The second study came along in 2017. This time more participants were used and a different amount of pre-sleep protein was given to the participants.

The structure of the study was the exact same: single session of resistance-type exercise, post-workout nutrition, and split into two groups, one getting protein before bed and the other getting placebo.

The difference: 30g of protein this time around.

This time the researchers did not see an increase in muscle protein synthesis rates in the group given a protein supplement 30 minutes before bed.

The long-term effects of pre-sleep protein on muscle mass and strength gains

Increasing muscle protein synthesis overnight is good, but, if you’re anything like me, maybe your curious what the long-term consequences would be.

Dr. van Loon covered this too.

In his 2015 study he put 44 young men on a 12-week resistance exercise training program. One group got protein before bed and the other got a placebo.

The group that ingested protein before bed experienced greater improvements in muscle strength and greater increases in muscle size compared to the group that got the placebo.

How much protein do you need and when?

When figuring out how much protein you need before bed to increase the rate of muscle protein synthesis, we really only have these three studies to rely on.

In the first study (2012) looking at muscle protein synthesis overnight, 40g of protein did the trick.

In the second study (2017), 30g of protein was not enough to increase muscle protein synthesis.

The long-term study used 27.5g of protein before bed and saw increased muscle strength and size.

What’s going on here?

The discrepancy between the 2017 study and the long-term study is a little confusing. Based on what we know, you can’t have an increase in muscle strength and size without having an increase in muscle protein synthesis.

However, the 2017 study and the long-term study seem to be suggesting just that. On the surface.

What may actually be happening here might just be due to math. Researchers must rely on something called statistical significance, which allows a person to attach a probability to the chances of them being right or wrong about something.

Just because the researchers in the 2017 study didn’t observe a statistically significant difference between the pre-sleep protein group and the placebo group doesn’t mean nothing was happening. The difference in muscle protein synthesis rate just might not have been large enough to reach that magic number.

If we choose to believe that pre-sleep protein before bed increases muscle protein synthesis rate, the results of the long-term study allow us to conclude that small increases over a long period of time will result in increased muscle strength and size.

Based on these studies, I would say you need at least 30g of protein 30 minutes before bed to experience muscle strength and muscle size gains.

30g of protein is about 4 ounces of lean ground beef or chicken breast. 5 ounces of salmon. Eight large egg whites. Or, a scoop and a half of a good protein supplement.

Conclusion

These studies conducted by Dr. van Loon in the Netherlands suggest that taking protein 30 minutes before you sleep will increase muscle protein synthesis and lead to increased muscle strength and size after at least 12 weeks of resistance training.

Based on these studies, I would say you need at least 30g of protein within 30 minutes of bedtime to experience these benefits.

What we still don’t know is the effectiveness of different types of protein (supplement versus food, for example) and how critical of a rule 30 minutes before bedtime is. Would an hour be better? Worse? The same?

As researchers look into this more and more we will get these answers one day. Until then, this is what we have to go on.

Have you tried protein before you go to sleep? Notice any changes in strength or muscle size? Let me know in the comments below.

Sources

Protein ingestion before sleep improves postexercise overnight recovery.

Presleep dietary protein-derived amino acids are incorporated in myofibrillar protein during postexercise overnight recovery

Protein Ingestion before Sleep Increases Muscle Mass and Strength Gains during Prolonged Resistance-Type Exercise Training in Healthy Young Men.

How stress is getting in the way of your weight loss goals

You go to the gym five days a week. You’re doing cardio. You’re weight training. You’re doing yoga. You take all the proper supplements. And… you haven’t dropped a pound.

Sound familiar?

If this sounds at all like you, then this article could put some things in perspective for you and take you beyond the plateau you currently find yourself stuck at.

The culprit that makes it impossible to budge the needle on the scale is stress.

Stress is often the hidden factor, lurking in the shadows, pulling the strings from beyond the veil that is preventing you from making any real progress when it comes to your weight loss goals.

In this article, we’ll go over how stress effects weight gain/loss. And we’ll cover some helpful ways to better manage stress that have worked for me in the past.

Stress and cortisol

When you perceive a situation as stressful, a tiny area at the bottom of your brain which acts as an alarm system (the hypothalamus) fires up. The hypothalamus tells the rest of your body that some serious shit is going down and we need all hands on deck to get the hell out of here.

The alarm signal gets to the rest of the body as the hypothalamus sends signals down to your adrenal glands.

The adrenal glands react to the signal by releasing a surge of hormones that will prime your brain and body to deal with the stressful situation.

The primary stress hormone released by the adrenal glands is cortisol.

Cortisol does two things: 1) it shuts down bodily functions that are nonessential to your immediate survival, and 2) it activates systems that are going to allow maximal physical and mental function for a short period of time.

The functions considered nonessential in the short term are your immune system, digestion, reproduction, and growth.

To be ready for maximal mental and physical exertion, cortisol increases the amount of sugar in the blood stream, enhances your brain’s use of glucose, and increases the availability of substances that repair tissues.

Increased blood sugar ensures working muscles have the energy they need to function maximally (in the case you have to run away from a life or death situation); enhancing your brain’s use of glucose ensures you’re thinking clearly in case the stressful situation requires some savvy to get out of; and increasing the availability of substances that repairs tissues ensures you can recover quickly if injured.

Cortisol and weight loss

This system has been evolutionarily designed to function in the short term.

It is perfect in situations where you need to make a quick getaway. Say, getting away from a bear that is chasing you, for instance.

The stress response, and its associated cortisol release, is not meant to function in the long term.

Unfortunately, most of the things that activate the stress response nowadays are slow burning and act over a long period of time.

Things like financial stress or pressure at work don’t flair up and go away within twenty minutes. They come and persist for months or even years.

The problem is, they activate the stress response in exactly the same way as a bear attack would.

Basically, you’re living your life like you’re constantly being chased by a bear. And it’s wearing you out.

The physiological response to long term cortisol causes you to change your eating patterns, which causes you to gain weight.

Cortisol increases sugar in the blood stream. In response, beta cells in the pancreas start to produce insulin.

The sequential cortisol insulin spike creates a huge upswing in blood sugar, followed by a drop.

The drop causes you to crave high fat, sugary foods to compensate. This is exactly what Dr. Clifford Roberts of Kings College in the UK observed when he measured the food consumed and dietary restraint of women that gained weight during a stressful time.

38 healthy women in a postgraduate course participated in the study. At the beginning of the semester and 15 weeks later (right before the final exam for the course) the composition of the food they consumed, their body mass index (BMI), their levels of dietary restraint, and their cortisol levels were measured.

Increased cortisol with reduced dietary restraint and increased caloric intake were the main factors explaining increases in BMI.

The researchers also found that increased consumption of carbohydrates and saturated fat contributed to the changes in dietary restraint that resulted in weight gain.

What are some good ways to manage stress?

  • Identify the source of the stress and remove it if possible

Of course, this isn’t always possible. Some regular stressors of daily life, such as work, family, and money, are here and they’re not going anywhere.

Some can be remedied. Fights with siblings or parents, squabbles with friends, a rough patch in your relationship… these can all be identified and dealt with.

  • Sleep!

Ever been so stressed out and overwhelmed by everything in your life, had one good night of sleep, and then found yourself bewildered by how much the stuff bothering you yesterday didn’t bother you at all today?

Sleeping well is your number one ally when it comes to stress management. Create the best conditions possible for good sleep and set aside enough hours in the day to feel rested.

  • Focus on good nutrition

As we’ve learned in this article, stress itself is not going to make you gain weight. It is our behavioral response to stress that makes us gain weight.

Focusing on maintaining good nutrition during stressful periods in life will help manage body weight during these times and also help you better manage the stress itself.

  • Adaptogens

Adaptogens can help your body adjust and prevent some of the damaging effects of stress on your body. Take them daily.

Stress is unavoidable. When it comes to stress and weight loss, there is really only one solution: manage it. Because you can’t get rid of it altogether.

Let me know in the comments if you have any other stress relieving techniques that have really worked for you!

Sources

Increases in weight during chronic stress are partially associated with a switch in food choice towards increased carbohydrate and saturated fat intake

 

10 energy-boosting habits to incorporate into your daily routine

Energy is your most valuable commodity. Nowadays, the shortage of time, the responsibilities, and the challenges of day-to-day life are endless.

If you don’t have the energy to look at your day and say, “I’ve got this,” you can find yourself in a constant mental state of feeling behind – the fatigue and exhaustion set in shortly after.

And you can only have so many cups of coffee.

Maybe you’re trying to cut back on caffeine and are searching for alternative ways to boost energy. Whatever your motives are, here are 10 healthy, research-backed, habits that will help you boost your energy.

Have fun kicking today in the butt!

1) Meditate

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Nursing is an exhausting profession – mentally and physically.

In a study recently published in the Frontiers of Human Neuroscience, a group of researchers tested the effects of 8-weeks of mindfulness based training on a group of 36 nurses. Throughout the course of the study, they measured the nurses’ ability to keep their attention focused and recorded brain activity during the task.

They found the energy required to maintain attention decreased as the nurses became more trained.

This study tells us meditation can boost energy by using less of it when we’re carrying out our day-to-day tasks.

2) Drink water

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Not drinking enough water decreases energy.

Scientists from the University of Connecticut’s Human Performance Laboratory showed that mild dehydration alters a person’s mood, energy levels, and ability to think clearly – even at rest.

Stay on top of your water game by drinking at least eight, 8-ounce glasses of water each day. If you wait until your thirsty, it’s already too late.

Boost your energy by staying hydrated!

3) Have a meal replacement shake for breakfast

Meal replacement shakes are great because they act as a full meal replacement (shocking, I know). Compared to a protein shake, which contains protein but minimal amounts of carbohydrate and fat, meal replacement shakes are packed with protein, carbs, fats, fiber, vitamins, and minerals.

When life is hectic, it’s easy to forego breakfast and rely on caffeine to get you through the morning. This inevitably leads to a late morning crash, however.

They’ll supply you with the energy you need to start the day. It gives you everything you need, and it’s one less decision to make in the morning as you head out the door.

4) Take a nap

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Naps are not for the lazy and unmotivated. Some powerful, famous people have effectively used a little midday shut-eye to keep themselves alert and effective. People like Margaret Thatcher, Thomas Edison, Winston Churchill, and Albert Einstein.

If it’s good enough for these geniuses, it’s good enough for you, right?

Sleep experts suggest 10-20 minute power naps are optimal for a quick boost of alertness.

Reset the system and close your eyes for a bit.

5) Take a walk

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Patrick O’Connor and Derek Randolph from the Department of Kinesiology at the University of Georgia found just 10-minutes of walking or climbing a flight of stairs is more effective for boosting energy than a 50mg tablet of caffeine.

They published their results in the journal: Physiology and Behavior.

This study suggests a more effective way to beat the mid-afternoon crash may be to get up and get moving, rather than reaching for another cup of coffee.

6) Get enough sleep

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We are not a culture that values sleep. In the U.S. the average hours of sleep during the work week is 6 hours and 40 minutes.

Combine that with another stat saying only 10 percent of adults require less than 7 to 8 hours and it’s reasonable to conclude that much of the population is sleep-deprived.

Not getting enough restful sleep is detrimental to daytime energy. Combat this detriment by making sleep a priority.

Some healthy bedtime habits include maintaining a consistent bed time, cutting down on screen use in the few hours before bed, and cutting back on caffeine – especially in the afternoon.

7) Take a break

Want to do more? Do less. That is, take more breaks.

Research suggests we’re designed to work in cycles of energy expenditure and rest. We typically override signals to recover by slamming coffee, energy drinks, or sugar.

Just five minutes of recovery where you take the time to get up, walk around, or have a glass of water can do wonders for your energy levels and your productivity.

Some take this concept further by using the pomodoro technique. This technique involves setting a timer for 25-minutes of non-stop work, then allowing yourself 5-minutes of recovery before you put in another 25-minutes. And the cycle continues.

8) Exercise regularly

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A counterintuitive way to combat fatigue and boost energy is to expend more energy.

The human body is incredibly adaptive. When you exercise, your body rises up to meet the energy challenge by making more energy available.

Low to moderate intensity exercise is the best for boosting energy levels.

9) Eat right

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Food is fuel. So, it’s not surprising that high-quality food leads to high-quality fuel and energy.

Keeping energy levels high requires a balanced diet including unrefined carbohydrates, proteins, and fats. Get your vegetables, whole grains, healthy oils, and take a daily multivitamin to ensure you get all the nutrients you need.

10) Get outside

healthy wheys corey munegatto isagenix residual income image 6

Spending time outdoors is good for the body; it’s good for the soul.

In 2010, lead investigator Richard Ryan (Professor of Psychology, Psychiatry, and Education) of the University of Rochester published a study being outside in nature makes people feel more alive.

They also suggested that the boost in energy people experienced went beyond just what you would expect from physical activity and social interaction alone.

Conclusion

The daily challenges of life can be exhausting. Adopting a lifestyle that puts you in the optimal physical and mental state to meet those challenges can do wonders.

Experiment with one or a few of the habits I’ve listed here and let me know how they work for you!

If you liked the article, please leave it a like. If you’re interested in more content, follow the blog and find Healthy Wheys on Instagram, Facebook, and Twitter.

 

 

Athletic performance: what’s alcohol got to do with it?

Alcohol: it’s so pervasive in our culture. We drink when we’re happy. We drink when we’re sad. Some sources say we’ve felt the need to get a little tipsy for as long as 10 million years.

In certain amounts it’s good for us. It may reduce the risk of developing and dying from heart disease, ischemic stroke, and diabetes.

In excessive amounts, however, it’s linked to liver disease, pancreatitis, cancer, ulcers and gastrointestinal problems, immune system dysfunction, brain damage, malnourishment and vitamin deficiencies, osteoperosis, and heart disease.

Have you ever wondered what it does to performance?

I have.

These are the things I think about when the team and I are sitting on the patio after a soccer game crushing a pitcher of Coors Light on a hot day. They’re reminiscing about their great shot or an amazing save; I’m silently contemplating what the alcohol is doing inside my body at that very moment.

I’ve learned there are direct effects of alcohol on performance and indirect effects.

healthy wheys corey munegatto isagenix kamloops

Direct effects of alcohol on performance

  1. Alcohol interrupts recovery and adaptation

Muscle gets broken down when you exercise as it strains to keep up with the excessive stress you’ve just placed on it (This isn’t a bad thing. It’s a very necessary component of adaptation). To recover, certain things need to happen. Things like protein synthesis.

Protein synthesis occurs in muscle after exercise to increase the size of muscle components. Increasing the size of muscle components makes the muscle stronger and able to function at a higher capacity than it did before.

Protein synthesis is why it’s so important to get nutrients, like protein, into your body within 30 minutes of exercise and again every three to four hours afterwards. Because your body is actively generating new muscle components and it needs the proper building blocks (protein) to do so.

Alcohol interrupts this recovery and adaptation process.

A group of researchers in Australia, led by Evelyn Parr, studied the effect of alcohol on muscle adaptation. The participants in the study completed a bout of resistance exercise followed by some cycling. They found consuming alcohol, even at the same time as protein, after this exercise bout decreased the rate of protein synthesis.

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  1. Alcohol impairs rehydration

If you’re doing any kind of real exercise, you’re going to break a sweat, which means you’re losing water. And water is pretty important in the body – it makes up 60% of the average person’s body weight.

There’s a whole list of things associated with even short-term or mild dehydration. These include headaches, reduced calorie control, muscle cramps, decreased athletic performance, and decreased cognitive performance.

Alcohol impairs rehydration because it is a diuretic. That means it is a substance that increases the production of urine.

Normally, there’s a little hormone circulating in the blood called anti-diuretic hormone (ADH). It gets secreted by the pituitary gland and tells the kidneys to keep water in the body and prevent some of it from getting drained away when you pee.

Alcohol tells the pituitary gland to stop secreting ADH. Less ADH means the kidneys aren’t getting the message to keep water in the body and more is getting passed out in the urine.

healthy wheys corey munegatto isagenix Avoiding holiday and Christmas fatigue 7 ways to keep your energy levels up image 4

Indirect effects of alcohol on performance

  1. Alcohol alters your eating patterns

Diet and performance are intimately linked. You put crap in your body you’re going to get crappy performance.

The alternative is also true. You put high quality stuff in your body and you’re going to get high quality performance.

Alcohol has an interesting effect on eating patterns.

Researchers from the Department of Psychiatry and Human Behavior at the Miriam Hospital in Rhode Island found eating patterns are altered before, during, and following drinking episodes. The participants in the study reported increased appetite, overeating, and making unhealthy food choices.

The findings of the study demonstrate the more long-term eating pattern changes with alcohol. It’s not just what you do while you’re drinking.

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  1. Alcohol affects your sleep

Drinking alcohol reduces the amount and quality of your sleep. Just one night of heavy drinking can reduce your sleep by one to three hours.

Alcohol decreases sleep amount by messing with adenosine – a chemical that makes you sleepy. Drinking alcohol rapidly increases adenosine levels making you tired and able to fall asleep very fast. But, it also causes adenosine to get cleared just as rapidly as it came on. This makes you wake up before you’re completely rested.

Sleep quality also decreases. Alcohol increases the amount of delta and alpha activity and interrupts REM sleep.

Delta activity is slow-wave sleep patterns normally present in sleep. It’s the kind of sleep that allows for memory formation and learning.

Alpha activity is the kind you don’t normally find during sleep. It’s more associated with wakeful rest.

So, with alcohol, you’re asleep, but you’re kind of awake at the same time.

REM sleep, or rapid eye movement sleep, occurs in intervals throughout the night. Not surprisingly, it’s characterized by rapid eye movements, more dreaming and bodily movement, and a faster pulse and breathing.

It’s also considered the most restful type of sleep.

With alcohol, you get less REM sleep, which means you feel groggy and unrested when you wake up.

healthy wheys corey munegatto isagenix kamloops

Conclusion

Alcohol can be good for you. But timing and amount are everything. Research now tells us that:

  • alcohol right after exercise impairs the recovery process (meaning you’re not going to get as much out of your workouts and your performance during your next gym bout isn’t going to be as good as it could have been),
  • it impedes rehydration and contributes to dehydration (which is directly linked to decreased cognitive and athletic performance)
  • it alters your eating patterns (poorer nutrition, poorer performance)
  • it leads to less restful sleep (less sleep, less recovery, poorer performance)

If you’re going to indulge in a few cold ones, keep it to a moderate amount and make sure you leave enough time after you exercise to let your body recover.

Have a great week and be sure follow the blog and follow Healthy Wheys on social media (Instagram, Facebook, and Twitter).

 

 

8 ways caloric restriction can improve your life

Calorie restricted diets are getting a considerable amount of attention. Probably due to article titles in such scientific publications as:

“Can we live longer by eating less? A review of caloric restriction and longevity”

“Calorie restriction and healthy ageing”

And

“Calorie restriction extends life span – but which calories?”

Despite its seemingly newfound fad status, the idea of caloric restriction isn’t all that new.

Famous historical figures like Hippocrates (a physician and considered one of the most outstanding figures in the history of medicine), Plato, and Aristotle (both instrumental thinkers in the development of philosophy) all spoke of the benefits of fasting.

“I fast for greater physical and mental efficiency.” – Plato

And religions that have existed for hundreds of years – Islam, Buddhism, Christianity, Hinduism – all incorporate periods of fasting in their rituals.

During the month of Ramadan, Islamics abstain from eating and drinking during the daylight hours; Buddhists fast during times of intensive meditation; some Christians fast as much as one or two days a week to seek a closer intimacy with God; and Hindus fast on certain days of the month, or as often as weekly – depending on their personal beliefs.

Considering humans have spent the majority of our existence committed to some sort of religious faith, you could say our modern fastless diet is the abnormal blip in our history.

Now that the attention of science has been directed to caloric restriction, we’re learning (or perhaps relearning) how beneficial it can be.

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Many studies suggest it has a beneficial effect on longevity – caloric restriction may allow you to live longer. But, I want to focus on the effects caloric restriction is going to have on your day-to-day life.

There’s no point living longer if you’re going to be miserable and hungry the whole time is there?

Here are 8 ways caloric restriction will improve your life in the here and now.

These results are observed in a study titled: “Effect of calorie restriction on mood, quality of life, sleep, and sexual function in healthy nonobese adults: the CALERIE 2 randomized clinical trial” published in the journal JAMA Internal Medicine.

In the study, researchers followed 220 men and women. Two-thirds followed a calorie restricted diet and the remaining third followed their normal diet. The participants came in for a battery of tests at the beginning of the study and 12 and 24 months after it began.

Here’s what they found.

  1. Caloric restriction improves mood

In contrast to the normal-diet group, the calorie restricted participants experienced a significant improvement in their mood between the beginning of the study and the 24-month mark.

Mood was assessed with the Beck Depression Inventory II and the Profile of Mood States tests.

  1. Caloric restriction reduces tension

The participants in the calorie restricted group also experienced a decrease in tension (defined as feelings of tightness, overwhelming anxiety, and uncertainty) over the 24-month period of the study. Tension is one of the subscales assessed in the Profile of Mood States test.

  1. Caloric restriction improves general health

The caloric restriction group displayed significant improvement in their general health at both measurement time points, 12 and 24 months.

In this study, general health was measured using the Rand 36-Item Short Form and the Perceived Stress Scale which measure mental aspects of quality of life (emotional problems, vitality, social functioning, and mental health) and physical aspects of quality of life (physical functioning, role limitations due to physical problems, bodily pain, and general health).

Overall, the test takes an expansive, wholistic view of the factors that contribute to a person’s well-being.

  1. Caloric restriction improves sexual drive and relationships

The caloric restriction group noticed improvements in their sexual drive and relationships relative to the normal-diet group.

This aspect of the study was assessed using the Derogatis Interview for Sexual Function-Self-report – a reliable and valid measure of sexual function.

  1. Caloric restriction maintains good sleep and improves good sleep perception

Sleep duration worsened in the normal-diet group compared to the calorie-restriction group at the 12-month mark of the study.

In addition to the better maintenance of sleep duration, the calorie-restricted group also had an improved perception of their quality of sleep, which was statistically associated with their weight loss.

The perceived sleep quality was measured with the Pittsburgh Sleep Quality Index. It takes into account subjective sleep quality, sleep latency, sleep duration, habitual sleep efficiency, sleep disturbances, use of sleep medications, and daytime dysfunction.

  1. Caloric restriction leads to more weight loss

The participants that stuck to their normal diet did not lose any weight over the course of the study. The calorie restriction group on the other hand, had an average weight loss of 15.2% at the 12-month mark and 11.9% at the 24-month mark.

  1. Caloric restriction increases vigor

The increased weight loss experienced by the calorie-restriction group was associated with increased vigor (another subscale of the Profile of Moods State test).

Vigor refers to a person’s physical and cognitive energy and spunk.

  1. Caloric restriction decreases mood disturbances

The increased weight loss in the calorie-restriction group was also associated with less mood disturbances.

Mood disturbances are defined as bouts of depression or anxiety in psychological terms.

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Conclusion

The thought of calorie restriction may seem daunting. When most people think of cutting back all they can think of is being hungry and hangry – quite the price to pay for a few extra years at the end of your life.

And this is a legitimate concern. Scientists studying calorie restriction have worried about the possible long-term drawbacks of eating fewer calories on the very things that were assessed in the study presented in this article: things like mood and sleep quality.

Dr. Corby K. Marting from Pennington Biomedical Research Center and the other authors of this study have put some of those concerns to rest.

These authors have been able to show that calorie restriction will not negatively impact your day-to-day life, it will actually improve it! It will leave you feeling happier and healthier overall.

What do you think about caloric restriction? Have you tried it? What was your experience like? Let me know in the comments.

As always, follow Healthy Wheys on social media (Instagram, Facebook, and Twitter), follow the blog, and check back regularly for new articles on health and fitness and living the best life you possibly can.

Contact me personally for advice and coaching. You can find my contact information on the contact page of this website.

Enjoy your weekend!